• Amy Miller

Infant Loss

An empty crib. An empty room. Unfortunately, approximately 10-20% of known pregnancies end in miscarriage. These are sad statistics that leave women feeling nervous and unsure once they see that positive blue line. We all hope it won't be us, but sometimes, it is. And there's usually no explanation.October is Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Month. This is a time when we honor the babies who have passed and look with compassion to the families who have suffered the loss.In decades past, women who experienced miscarriage or still birth were told to "just have another baby," "forget about it," or "move on." There was very little, if any, remembrance of the child and they were often never spoken of again. But a mother never forgets. NEVER.Thankfully, our society now sees these babies who were born still as human beings worthy of remembrance. In 1988, October was declared to be a month where we remember those who were born still. We no longer run from the grief or place feelings of shame on those who have lost babies. We recognize that "IT'S NOT YOUR FAULT." Sometimes bad things just happen.If you or someone you know have experienced a loss, I'd love for you to participate in this month of Remembrance with Red House Birth Care. All month long, on the Red House Birth Care Facebook page, I'll be posting memorials for babies who were born still or who passed on at a young age. If you send me baby's name, birth date, time of birth or any other information you'd like to share, I'll create a memorial just for your baby that can be shared on social media. Feel free to also send me your stories if you'd like to share those as well.This type of sharing isn't for everyone and that is totally fine. For many people, sharing the memory of such a short life is very healing and brings a lot of comfort.Just as a rainbow comes after a storm, most families go on to experience new life after a loss. Rather than fear miscarriage, I choose to live in the expectation that pregnancy and birth are normal, healthy processes that end in healthy babies MOST of the time. When they don't, we do the best we can to honor them and care for their families during this most difficult time.



An empty crib. An empty room. Unfortunately, approximately 10-20% of known pregnancies end in miscarriage. These are sad statistics that leave women feeling nervous and unsure once they see that positive blue line. We all hope it won't be us, but sometimes, it is. And there's usually no explanation.


October is Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Month. This is a time when we honor the babies who have passed and look with compassion to the families who have suffered the loss.


In decades past, women who experienced miscarriage or still birth were told to "just have another baby," "forget about it," or "move on." There was very little, if any, remembrance of the child and they were often never spoken of again. But a mother never forgets. NEVER.


Thankfully, our society now sees these babies who were born still as human beings worthy of remembrance. In 1988, October was declared to be a month where we remember those who were born still. We no longer run from the grief or place feelings of shame on those who have lost babies. We recognize that "IT'S NOT YOUR FAULT." Sometimes bad things just happen.


If you or someone you know have experienced a loss, I'd love for you to participate in this month of Remembrance with Red House Birth Care. All month long, on the Red House Birth Care Facebook page, I'll be posting memorials for babies who were born still or who passed on at a young age. If you send me baby's name, birth date, time of birth or any other information you'd like to share, I'll create a memorial just for your baby that can be shared on social media. Feel free to also send me your stories if you'd like to share those as well.


This type of sharing isn't for everyone and that is totally fine. For many people, sharing the memory of such a short life is very healing and brings a lot of comfort.


Just as a rainbow comes after a storm, most families go on to experience new life after a loss. Rather than fear miscarriage, I choose to live in the expectation that pregnancy and birth are normal, healthy processes that end in healthy babies MOST of the time. When they don't, we do the best we can to honor them and care for their families during this most difficult time.


Peace to those who are grieving. Light to those who need it.





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